With Pandemic Preventing Pampering in Person, Spa Goes Virtual

 Even limited to online interaction, cosmetologist and oncology- trained esthetician Jeanna Doyle conducted a skin consult, taught the client to recreate eyebrows with makeup, and helped her find a wig.

Despite working in an industry that’s “licensed to touch,” Doyle’s specialty spa, The Hopemore, has services that are particularly suited to the pandemic circumstances. It also ships products to clients.

“What was really fortunate for us in the way we had designed the business all along was that we would be able to communicate with our clients, so we have been able to service them through this time,” Doyle said.

The Hopemore provides both oncology-focused and everyday esthetics, offering a variety of skincare treatments, wig consults, regular and corrective makeup for those experiencing injury, illness, or elective procedures.

“A lot of times, a woman will feel like going out before she looks like it, so she may still have bruising or telltale signs of surgery, so my kind of wheelhouse is that corrective makeup piece,” Doyle said.

She has worked with women who had cancer throughout her career and, before opening last November, approached co-founder Gina Betts, a Park Cities attorney, with the concept.

“I thought if I could have a place that offered everyday esthetics and the oncology-focused esthetics, then when people come to the spa, they wouldn’t know if it was because someone had cancer or they just wanted our other services.”

Jeanna Doyle

“I wanted something that also offered them anonymity,” Doyle added. “So I thought if I could have a place that offered everyday esthetics and the oncology-focused esthetics, then when people come to the spa, they wouldn’t know if it was because someone had cancer or they just wanted our other services.”

Doyle knew that a certain amount of their clientele would be immune-suppressed, so virtual care options would prove crucial.

“This is a great service for them to be able to stay at home and still get the care they need through our recommendations and protocols we set up for them,” Doyle said.

The Hopemore, with four treatment rooms in a corner of Neiman Marcus’ downtown flagship, reopened June 2, a bit later than some spas.

Doyle wanted time to evaluate the situation and what it would look like once in-person services resumed. The spa’s set up and precautions are similar to how the place operated before. It still uses separate waiting areas and sanitization protocols, and estheticians and clients now wear masks and gloves.

In that regard, virtual consults have an added advantage — no masks, Doyle said. “You see the person, you get to connect with them in a way that’s really kind of a cool platform, and it’s amazing that we have the technology and are able to do this.”

Even though she expects more spas to offer virtual services in the future, Doyle thinks clients still crave the touch and experience a visit to a spa provides.

“I think people have shown through all their posts and stuff that they miss going in and, you know, having their hair done or having their skincare service done,” Doyle said. “I think that’s never going to go away.”


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